QUESTIONS FOR THE EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGIST

What should parents ask after testing? What is important for parents to know? The testing process and feedback session can be overwhelming for parents. The most important piece you should walk away with is a complete picture of how your child learns.


Parent Goals for a Meeting with the Psychologist

  • Your Child's Potential

    Have an understanding of the child’s potential, and whether their academic and processing skills are consistent with their potential.

  • Understand the Road Map

    Feel comfortable with the “road map” that has been presented, based on their child’s dyslexia test results. There should not be any surprises. If there are, or if there is any confusion, parents should feel comfortable speaking or meeting with the psychologist again.

  • Understand the Numbers

    Ask the psychologist to help them understand the numbers and how they will be reported and interpreted.

If parents feel overwhelmed with the quantity of information they are receiving, they should ask the psychologist to help them prioritize interventions and recommendations. Often psychologists will recommend several interventions, for example, depending on each different individual’s dyslexia test results. It is imperative that parents leave the office feeling that they can accomplish the goals. If overwhelmed, they are more likely to be paralyzed and the interventions or strategies get put on hold.

 

Another point that would be important for parents to address is the notion of monitoring and assessing progress. Sometimes, parents don’t know that a re-evaluation is necessary down the road to enable accommodations and support to continue. Also, they need to be their child’s advocate with regard to receiving support and services.It is not enough, for example, that a child receives an IEP. They need to be receiving specialized instruction as part of that IEP. Often, they are only getting the same instruction in a smaller group format, if that.

The Dyslexia ResourceQuestions for the Educational Psychologist